Overcoming a Crystal Meth Addiction

Crystal Meth, which is short for methamphetamine, has the potential to do serious damage to your body. It’s incredibly addictive and provides a very intense high. Although it’s available as the prescription Desoxyn, the street version is made in underground ‘labs’ and widely abused across America. There are small scale illegal meth operations throughout the US but most of the meth consumed is trafficked into America from Mexico. If you or someone you know is addicted to Crystal Meth, don’t wait to reach out to Soba Mesa to find out how we can help you overcome your addiction.

What is Crystal Meth?

Crystal meth is an illicit drug that looks like chunks of crystals or blue rocks. While methamphetamine forms the foundation of certain prescription medications, including treatments for ADHD, crystal meth is molecularly different and not a controlled substance. This makes it more addictive and dangerous.

When someone takes crystal meth, their brain ends up getting flooded with a neurotransmitter called dopamine. Crystal meth also blocks dopamine from leaving the brain, trapping it in the brain’s neurons for longer periods of time. This leads to a pleasurable high. This is the reason why crystal meth is so addictive.

Eventually, with repeated use, the brain develops a tolerance to crystal meth. This means that people end up needing more meth to cause the same high. This is due to the depletion of dopamine levels in the brain over time. When the dopamine levels drop too low, this leads to intense meth cravings, causing someone to lose control. This is where the physical, mental, and psychological symptoms arise.

What Are the Signs & Symptoms of a Meth Addiction?

If you or a loved one is suffering from an addiction to crystal meth, there are a number of symptoms to look out for. The mental and emotional symptoms include: 

  • The inability to learn new skills or retain important information
  • A struggle to recall information and make inferences when presented with a set of facts
  • Problems with abstract thinking, problem-solving, and judgment
  • Problems reading, writing, and recognizing words
  • Feelings of paranoia or irritability

 

Physical symptoms of meth addiction include:

  • Weight loss
  • Skin irritation like excessive scratch marks
  • Meth mouth 
    • This is a serious oral hygiene issue that causes the mouth to rot and teeth fall out

Crystal meth can also cause you to become profoundly depressed when not using this substance. The depletion of dopamine in the brain drives this depression, leading to a number of symptoms. These might include a loss of interest in certain activities, trouble sleeping, unusual eating habits, and even suicidal ideation. 

How To Get Help

If you need help with a crystal meth addiction, seek professional help now. Soba Mesa offers various treatment programs and therapies which will help you to learn how to live life meth free.

Our first phase of treatment is detoxification. This is the process of safely removing crystal meth from your body. Withdrawal side effects can be mild to severe but we do our best to keep you as comfortable as possible during this time. We also have medical staff onsite to monitor your health 24/7. 

After detox is inpatient treatment. This is where you’ll work with therapists and counselors to identify the cause of your addiction and how to cope with your emotions in a healthy way. Some of the therapies we offer during treatment include: art therapy, anger management, relapse prevention, 12-step groups, meditation, and equine therapy. 

We also have aftercare treatment available for when you complete inpatient treatment. We’re dedicated to giving you all the tools you need to maintain sobriety once you finish residential inpatient treatment. 

Reach Out to Us

Don’t let meth ruin your life any longer. At Soba Mesa, we are a luxury detox & drug rehab program located in the beautiful, Southwestern region of Mesa, AZ We are one of the premier drug abuse and addiction treatment programs. We have a variety of resources that our professionals use to help individuals break the bonds of addiction and start the recovery process. If you would like to learn more about how we can help you, please contact us today! With the help of our addiction treatment specialists, we are confident that you can not only get sober but stay clean as well.

8 Signs Someone You Love May be Using Drugs

Drug addiction doesn’t happen overnight. It generally starts with occasional, recreational use and gradually with repeated use; it progresses into the need for regular use regardless of the risk to your relationships, your health, your career, and your finances. Addiction is the psychological and physical need to continue use, regardless of the effects. The amount of time it takes before substance abuse takes hold on someone’s life varies from person to person, but eventually, the individual feels compelled to seek out their substance of choice due to strong cravings. It’s important to keep in mind that most people with a substance abuse problem tend to keep their addiction a secret and it’s unlikely that they admit to the problem. Learning the signs that someone you care about is abusing drugs and/or alcohol may be the difference between life and death. Here are 8 signs that someone you care about may be using drugs.

Physical Changes in Appearance

Changes in appearance are the most common sign of drug abuse. Some of the most common changes in appearance may include:

  • Weight loss or gain
  • Pale skin
  • Changes in dental health
  • Hair loss
  • Fatigue

Keep in mind that these changes may be gradual, but in many situations, the changes are relatively sudden and often times very drastic. The person may also have bloodshot or glassy eyes, their pupils may constrict or dilate, they may have a constantly runny nose and/or they may have sores on their skin, which are often caused by scratching, injections and/or picking at the skin.

Personal Hygiene

It’s also common for someone with a substance abuse problem to have a decline in their personal hygiene. If the person appears unkempt, such as not showering, brushing their teeth and wearing the same clothes daily, they may have a substance abuse problem and should addiction treatment as soon as possible.

Missed Work or School

Although people who have a substance abuse problem do their best to manage their everyday life, unfortunately, their addiction generally wins in the end. They often miss a lot of work or school, which is often the result of all-night binges or simply losing interest in anything but their substance of choice. Substance abuse changes the way people look at their responsibilities. Their priorities shift and typically in ways that aren’t admirable. For instance, someone that is typically dependable will begin to forget appointments, miss deadlines and be just generally unreliable.

Money Problems

An addiction is an expensive habit, one that can cost hundreds, even thousands of dollars weekly in order to maintain daily use of substance supply. Individuals with a drug abuse problem often spend large, unexplained amounts of money, drain their bank account and go outside their budget in order to supply their habit. Unfortunately, once they have depleted their personal finances, people with a substance abuse problem often turn to steal money and/or items that can be sold. If the person is constantly in need of financial assistance because they “lost” their money or their money is “missing”, it may be a sign of drug abuse. It is important to not enable the person by giving them money to buy their drugs. It is essential that you stand your ground, even if they become angry or try to put pressure on you-enabling does not help them.

Poor Judgment

Individuals that have a drug abuse problem will usually do anything to obtain their substance of choice, including participating in risky, dangerous behaviors, such as lying, stealing, selling drugs and engaging in unsafe sexual activity. These behaviors often result in the individual being arrested and spending time in jail; however, this generally doesn’t deter them and once they are released from jail, they will continue participating in these risky behaviors.

Unhealthy Friendships

Changes in friendship may not be uncommon, but some changes may be drastic. For instance, a newly abandoned longtime friend will have no idea why the person stopped being friends with them. People with a drug abuse problem may change friends by simply changing the crowd they hang out with; this is because they want to spend time with others who have similar habits.

Change in Behavior

One of the most common signs of a substance abuse problem is that the person becomes defensive, secretive and isolated. They tend to refuse to answer questions with a straight answer. For instance, when asked where they have been, the answer is typically something like “why do you care” or it may be as simple as “out”.  Their mood is generally unpredictable and may include sudden outbursts, acting erratically and may shift suddenly from positive to negative.

Denial

Someone with a drug abuse problem will not only deny they have a problem, but they will deny anything and everything they are confronted with. In many situations, the denial isn’t only for your benefit, but for theirs as well. It’s typically difficult for someone with a drug abuse problem to admit they need addiction treatment and it’s because they really do not think they have a problem. Many people with an addiction will not reach out for help or quit using drugs/alcohol on their own.

It’s important to remember that addiction is a disease that affects everyone. The individual with the addiction is affected physically, psychologically and emotionally as are their family and friends. People with an addiction problem often need loved ones to step in and help them get the help they need, so by knowing the signs of addiction, you can address the situation as early as possible and encourage them to get the life-saving help they need.

If you are concerned that someone you care about may have a substance abuse problem, contact Soba Mesa for information about how we can help.